NaijaAgroNet:


The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA 2018) reports that 90.9 million tonnes of fish was captured in the world in 2016, a slight decrease of 2 million tonnes from the year before, mainly due to periodic fluctuations in populations of Peruvian Anchoveta associated with El Niño, reports NaijaAgroNet.


Generally, the amount of fish being captured in the wild plateaued starting in the 1990s and has remained largely stable since. 

Despite that fact, the world has for decades been consuming ever greater amounts of fish – 20.4 kg per capita in 2016 versus just under 10 kg/pc in the 1960s — thanks in no small part to increased production via aquaculture, a sector which expanded rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s. 

In 2016, production from aquaculture reached 80 million tonnes, according to SOFIA 2018 — providing 53 percent of all fish consumed by humans as food. 

While aquaculture’s growth has slowed — it experienced 5.8 percent annual growth between 2010 and 2016, down from 10 percent in the 1980s and 1990s — it will still continue to expand in the coming decades, especially in Africa. 

Efforts to reduce the amount of fish being discarded at sea or thrown out post-capture — for example by using discards and trimmings to produce fishmeal — will also help meet ongoing increases in demand for fish products. 


Isaac Oyimah/GEE

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This post was originally published at Naija AgroNet by ITRealms DSA. It has been republished here with permission.

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